How to use: MANY, MUCH, FEW, LITTLE, A LOT OF

The words many, much, few, little mean quantity. Many and  few are used before countable nouns. Much and   little — before uncountable:

  • I have a lot of friends
  • There were few mistakes in the test
  • There is a lot of snow on the ground
  • There’s little sugar left

If the indefinite article a is used before the words few and little, it means a small but sufficient amount. It should be noted that a few is used before plural countable nouns:

  • Are there a few buildings there?
  • Vicky has made a little progress
MUCHMANY
With uncountable nouns (most often in negative and interrogative sentences)With countable nouns (most often in negative and interrogative sentences)
  • Do you have much work to do?
  • I haven’t got much money
  • Are there many mistakes in your test?
  • Today there are not many people here

In affirmative sentences, instead of many/much, synonyms are mainly used: A lot of, lots of, plenty of, a great deal of/a large number of.

LITTLEFEW
With uncountable nounsWith countable nouns
  • I have little money
  • Dan has got few friends
A LITTLEA FEW
  • I have a little time
  • I have a few apples. Do you want some?

Such phrases as a lot of, lots of are used to indicate a large amount. They are used with plural countable nouns and singular uncountable nouns. In modern English, a lot of, lots of are usually used in affirmative sentences, a many, much — in negative and interrogative sentences:

  • We have got a lot of friends  — We have got a lot of work
  • We haven’t got many friends  — We haven’t got much work
  • Have we got many friends?  — Have we got much work?

MUCH or MANY or A LOT OF??? Countable and Uncountable Nouns!

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